Timber Frame FAQs

A timber frame self-build in progress
How does a timber frame house structure differ from a masonry house?
A modern masonry house is normally made of an inner supporting wall of concrete blocks and an outer supporting wall of brick. A modern timber frame house replaces the inner wall with a timber frame strong enough to carry all the loads of the house. This is usually covered by plasterboard internally and a brick external finish.

Can I build a timber frame house if I have a base built for a masonry house?
As timber frame buildings incorporate all of the wall insulation in the wall structure itself, a 50mm cavity is all that is required. Masonry houses usually incorporate the insulation in the cavity, which  would typically have a 100mm cavity. Therefore, some adjustment may be necessary.

Is any specialist equipment required to build a timber frame house?
A timber frame construction generally consists of prefabricated wall and floor panels so some lifting equipment is usually required. Typically, a crane would be hired for the time it takes to get the trusses loaded onto the roof.

Water Management FAQs

A Kingspan domestic sewage treatment plant
What permissions are required before installing a sewage treatment tank/plant?
In the UK, any unit going into the ground may require ‘consent to discharge’ from the local Environment Agency / SEPA office, even if you are using just a storage tank. Planning permission is required from the local Building Control department.

What is a Klargester BioDisc Treatment System?
The Klargester BioDisc forms a range of Sewage Treatment Plants that biologically treat household and light commercial wastewater using the unique Rotating Biological Contactor (RBC) technology. The range covers from a single house up to a small community’s requirements. 

Is there a guarantee on Klargester products?
All Klargester products are supplied with a 12-month guarantee from date of delivery.

Oil Tanks FAQs

A Kingspan oil tank product
What is the difference between a single skin tank and a bunded oil tank?
A single skin tank is made up of just one tank wall, whereas a bunded oil tanks consists of a “tank within a tank” design. If the inner tank splits within a bunded tank, the outer tank offers that additional layer of protection. Choosing between a single skin or bunded oil tank can be difficult, however in the event of an oil spill the clean-up costs can be considerable and may not be covered under your house insurance.

What support structure is needed for my oil tank?
The base should be: 
  • Adequate for the weight of the tank
  • Non-combustible, imperforate and level
  • Constructed of concrete, paving stones or stonework
  • Large enough to extend 300mm beyond all sides of the tank
The tank itself can be weakened over time leading to leakages if it is not supported correctly. Ground conditions over time may also change and it is important to ensure the structural support remains in its original condition.

Can I install an oil tank myself?
Oil tanks should always be installed by a trained technician or preferably a OFTEC approved installer. With over 40 years’ experience designing oil tanks, we have a team of preapproved OFTEC installers in your local area.